Dear Editor, 

According to the Pew research center, about a third of the country are non-Christians, close to a quarter are unaffiliated; per Gallup more than half the country believes in a woman’s right to have agency over her own body. The country is also majority liberal.

Eight out of the nine justices are Christian, six of them conservative, and strongly guided by their religious beliefs. If the separation of religion and state were a reality, this country should not have a problem with an atheist or a Muslim in the court; why does that seem so unlikely in the current environment?

The Constitution stays silent on the size of the court, so we should not waste words and digital headspace pondering the numbers. Technically the next administration and all who come after it, can expand and contract the courts as they fit. The court is currently ‘packed’ with ideologies that do not fairly represent the values of the nation. That is the only kind of packing that matters. The court should have as many justices as needed to fairly represent the values and culture of the country, and that is the only count that matters.

That said, changes to the number and composition of the court can become a useless p***ing fight. In addition to not really addressing the underlying problems, those of not fairly representing the nation’s values and of politicization.

The lifetime appointment of justices was intended to provide them job security, freeing them from influence and political pressures.

Mala Rajamani

Herndon, VA

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