Adorable. Cute. Pawsome. Sweet. Handsome. No, not words about me, though fitting and truthful as they are, but these words are often used to describe puppies! I remember being a puppy – it seems like just last week when I was scampering around my newfound world looking for something to eat and generally making a mess.

When I was a puppy, I was a rascally thing getting into everything! BARKS! And, when I went through the terrible two’s, you should have seen the fun I had stealing things from the bathroom, the bedroom and down the hallway. Paws, my human did a pawsome job training me but slip-ups can be exciting! Here’s a story about my friend’s puppy! He was left in the bathroom while they went to work. The dog chewed through the bathroom door, creating some beautiful artwork in the bathroom and in the house. YIKES?! The dog’s human didn’t have appropriate time to train the guy! Raising a puppy is challenging, rewarding, and pawsome adventure. Puppies require time to train properly to become well-respected citizens of our universe. The early years of puppydom training are important.

Barks, working full-time with no one home for long periods may not the best idea nor is it the worst. My humans learned ways to work their schedule so I could be trained properly. Before adopting, be sure to study the requirements of puppydom and your lifestyle. Dog rescue volunteers are great resources to share with you what would be best for you and the little fellow.

My friends at Lab Rescue brought by pawsome puppies for you to meet! Here’s their story: Pretty Girl came to Lab Rescue from a North Carolina shelter very pregnant. She was taken to the veterinarian who determined she had at least seven pups and was probably due in a couple of weeks. She surprised everyone by going into labor and having nine puppies. They are eight weeks old and ready to go home! They are healthy pups and have been examined by a veterinarian.

Paws, are puppies even for you? Want a dog with less energy, tons of love, who doesn’t require as much training and makes a great companion? Have you considered a senior dog?

A few weeks ago, my human had the opportunity to chat with Lab Rescue volunteer Jodi who shares about her experience recently adopting a senior dog: “I have had the good fortune to volunteer as an adopter /foster for more than 20 Labrador Retrievers associated with Lab Rescue of LRCP. While all of the dogs are precious, each in their own way, it is the seniors that stand out as the most endearing to me. Lucky was no exception. After living with one family for more than 12 years, Lucky's owners found it necessary to surrender him. How fortunate for him that this amazing organization takes in Labs that others would consider unadoptable.”

“While many people are drawn to puppies, not everyone has the time or inclination to train a dog or tend to an exuberant puppy. In contrast to the younger dogs, older dogs are house-broken and can be trusted alone at home without disturbing anything. Senior dogs tend to sleep in, walk well on a leash and take time to smell the roses. They love to take naps and even remember a few tricks. Like all labs, seniors love their humans and want nothing more than to be part of the family, but those who are re-homed at an old age demonstrate a palpable sense of appreciation for anyone who shows them the least kindness.”

“It was my good fortune to be Lucky's handler for an adoption event, and within a few minutes I knew he would be mine! A distinguished older gentleman with frosted eyebrows and a silver beard, Lucky maintains a tennis ball in his mouth, a charming head tilt and Lab lean. This precious senior instantly bonded with our family, peacefully naps on his soft bed and purrs when petted. In short order, Lucky serves as a comfort dog, visiting with homeless people in a local winter relief shelter. What Lucky has given back to my family and to those less fortunate members of the community has been immeasurable. Who's the lucky one?”

Visit the Lab Rescue Senior Labradors page at: https://www.lab-rescue.org/Seniors.

Contact: Lab Rescue of L.R.C.P., Inc. www.lab-rescue.org, (301) 299-6756, email info@lab-rescue.org.

About Me:

Noah is Pawthor of www.fromthedogspaw.com- A blog about dog/cat adoption, humor, dog adventures and facts about dogs and cats. He is Dog to his human, Allen Pearson, Dog Photographer and Writer, www.allenpearsonsphotos.com, www.facebook.com/AllenPearsonsPhotos, www.instagram.com/fromthedogspaw.

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