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The National New Play Network Rolling World Premiere of Lauren Gunderson’s “I And You” continues to March 23 at the Olney Theatre Center. Directed by Eleanor Holdridge, the play follows the chronically ill, bedridden Caroline and the young man, Anthony, who shows up in her bedroom one evening with what he claims is a joint a homework assignment regarding Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself.” But Caroline cannot remember ever meeting Anthony before. As the two delve into the poem, a greater mystery begins to unfold. The Rolling World Premiere launched at Marin Theatre Company in Mill Valley, Calif., in October 2013, and will continue with performances at the Phoenix Theatre in Indianapolis, Ind., later this month. For more information, visit olneytheatre.org.

Steve Martin’s “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” closes this Sunday at the Laurel Mill Playhouse. Produced by Maureen Rogers and directed by Stephen Deininger, the absurdist comedy pairs Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso at the titular Parisian cafe at the turn of the 20th century, where the two discuss and debate achievements of the prior 100 years and other assorted musings. Up next at the theater, “You Can’t Take It With You,” opening March 21, marries madcap mirth, familial bonds and young love to hilarious results. For more information, visit laurelmillplayhouse.org.

In Fairfax County, “From Suffrage to Secretary of State,” an exhibit of new paintings by Julia Dzikiewicz exploring feminism in the beginnings of the suffrage movement, is on view to April 6 at the Workhouse Arts Center, 9601 Ox Road, Lorton, Va. An opening reception is scheduled for 6-9 p.m. Saturday, in conjunction with the 2nd Saturday Art Walk. Dzikiewicz’s large figurative works in encaustic — a beeswax based paint — attempt to tell tales in a dark, colorful or humorous way. Her feminism series was launched shortly after she learned the history of the former Occoquan Prison — currently Studio 503 at Workhouse, where she creates. Occoquan at one time imprisoned women who picketed the White House in 1917, asking for the vote. Normal gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, visit workhousearts.org.