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This story was corrected on Sept. 3, 2013. Details of the correction follow the story.

In November 2009, popular rock band Fall Out Boy decided it was time for a break. Shortly after the release of their greatest hits album, each member of the group took time to decompress, bassist Pete Wentz said.

Fall Out Boy

When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10

Where: Patriot Center, 4500 Patriot Circle, Fairfax

Tickets: $39.50 plus service charges

For information: 703-993-3000

patriotcenter.com

ticketmaster.com

Fast forward to 2012. Rumors start swirling that Fall Out Boy was set to come back. The band downplayed the reports, all the while writing and recording their next album, “Save Rock and Roll.”

The next year, the band officially announced their return and soon after released the new album, which debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart.

With songs such as “My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light Em Up),” and “The Phoenix,” Fall Out Boy set out on a new tour, which makes a stop at the Patriot Center in Fairfax on Sept. 10.

Joe Trohman, the guitarist who’s been with the band from the beginning, said the time away was therapeutic for the band.

“We were touring for like eight years straight without a break,” Trohman said. “It was hard to see the forest from the trees at that point. It was hard for us to appreciate each other — professionally and personally.”

Trohman said the hiatus allowed the band to really step back and acquire a newfound respect for the group.

“Not that we took it for granted, but like really appreciate all the things that we have been able to do with the band.”

Once the band got back together, Trohman said putting “Save Rock and Roll” together was fun.

“I guess I’m going to have to use this cliche — it was organic,” Trohman said. “Basically, we started talking about doing the band again in a very light manner. Pete and Patrick [Stump] had written an idea they thought was very Fall Out Boy, so they started talking to the rest of us.”

After some discussions with the group, the band decided to start writing songs. Immediately, according to Trohman, the guys started putting pen to paper.

“Here’s the thing, we wrote so many songs — hundreds of songs and ideas,” Trohman said. “Partially because I think there are some realistic people in this band and also because we’re a little hard on ourselves in a good way, we’ll write a bunch of stuff and we will only allow what we think is the best material to sift through.”

Fall Out Boy wasn’t content with having just their work on the album. The band recruited such stars as Courtney Love, Elton John, Big Sean and Foxes to record on the album as well.

“Patrick got to go into the studio with Elton John and we usually never get the chance to actually go into the studio with people,” Trohman said. “Even though we gave [John] the lyrics and told him this is kind of the part, he went and really did his own thing, which is awesome. It was a little different from how we’ve approached things before.

“With Courtney’s part, as well as Foxes’ part and Big Sean’s, we gave them a section to work on. ... Courtney Love and Big Sean, we were like ‘Here’s some sections, here’s some open space. Write something.’”

Fans of Fall Out Boy can be found all over the globe, which is evident by their sold-out concerts here in the U.S. and overseas. For those fans, Trohman said he really hopes they take away just how important the lyrics to their songs are.

“I hope they’re able to digest those,” Trohman said. “Not just understand them the way that we intend them to be understood, but also that they find their own important meaning.”

On the Internet, the band is labeled everything from pop rock to emo to punk. Trohman said the guys in the band prefer just being known as Fall Out Boy.

“That’s something we like to leave up to critics and fans,” Trohman said. “We don’t look at ourselves under any of those kind of genre classifications. Maybe a little bit at the beginning when we started 12 years ago because we were younger. ... I think when you’re young you tend to look at everything in a box to a degree musically. As we’ve gotten old, we realized we love so many different things and we want to be able to incorporate all those things into this band in our own way.

“At this point, I think we just really want to sound like Fall Out Boy.”



Correction: A missing word was added to the story.



wfranklin@gazette.net