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In all the finger pointing over what should be done about mass shootings, the focus has been on the three M's — military-style magazine clips, mental health, and media culture — as causes to be addressed. The federal government has been viewed as a savior, even by the NRA, and the font of such solutions as legislation and funding for armed guards, armed personnel, and armed volunteers in our nation's schools. Its influence in the equation has been largely overlooked.

Spanning both Republican and Democratic administrations, the U.S. has been continuously engaged in what are essentially glorified occupations, forcefully interfering somewhere — Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya — for more than a few years. This country recently began utilizing drone and technological attacks to effect the same purpose.

In 2011, the Supreme Court, in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association, rejected California's ban on the sale or rental of violent video games to minors, with Justice Samuel Alito concluding that playing them was no different from reading the same in books. Justice Scalia's opinion three years earlier in District of Columbia v. Heller adopted Justice Clarence Thomas' 1997 assertion in dissent in Printz v. U.S. that the "right to keep and bear arms" is "personal," creating a liberty interest unrelated to militia participation, to which our current President subscribes.

Maybe MORE, MORE, MORE government is the problem, or at least an equal part of it ... Committing precious taxpayer dollars to ensuring that guns are ubiquitously present in our children's educational institutions may only serve to teach them MORE aggression is "the way" ... MORE of the same.

Karen Ann DeLuca

Alexandria