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Im responding to the Times article ["School Board to study later high school start times"] from the April 20-22 issue.

Maybe I am simply old school and tow a hard line with discipline. I have a sophomore daughter at Oakton High School who has AP History, a few honors classes, plays varsity soccer and travel soccer.

Does she like getting up early? No.

Does she need an adult to wake her up? No.

She understands it's a fact of life and it also allows her to play sports. Later start times mean greater demand for field space.

Did I mention she maintains a 4.0 grade point average or better? Is she overweight? No.

The article mentions these early start times could be a contributory factor toward obesity. How about lack of exercise and poor diet? Physical and mental health? My daughter rarely is sick and certainly does not have mental health issues. Discipline? .. Well that starts with the parents.

If you really want to study this, check out Nation of Wimps or Dr. Oz or Dr. Hyman. See what they have to say. If you really want to do your kid(s) and yourself a favor, eat right and exercise regularly. Skip the fast food, lead by example, and use this phrase often: "Is that a good choice?"

Your article quotes "sleep deprivation affects student learning, it affects physical and mental health. It affects behavior, discipline, drowsy driving, graduation rates, dropout rates ... as well as obesity and immunity to disease.

Well, guess what? The fuel (food) you put in your system and the amount of exercise you do has a greater impact on all of the aforementioned than sleep!

Please do yourself and your child a favor. Learn more about the foods you eat, read labels, and make good choices. Then you won't need to worry so much about all the other nonsense. You will see these better choices mold you and your child into a fitter, happier and healthier self. You will see your child perform better academically and athletically!

You owe this to yourself and you certainly owe it to your children!

Erik J. Weisskopf, Oakton